Brasilia

Gerard and Margi Moss with their Seneca aircraft.This comes to you from a sunny Brasilia, where we have been staying with Margi & Gerard Moss. The Mosses have been very good to us, and it is amazing just how many parallels there are between them and us. We feel very privileged. Their work involves flying along the couses of Brazil’s rivers, sampling the water quality – see www.brasildasaguas.com.br.

We also met a researcher, Dayse Kinzo, who is working on a World Bank project with FUNASA to try to improve the understanding of, and encourage the use of, traditional medicine in indigenous communities, a great project!
Meeting at FUNAI.Since arriving in Brasilia, we have been amassing yet more equipment. We met officials from FUNAI, including the redoubtable Chief Megaron Txukarramãe and Chief Yabutí Metuktire.

We have managed to ‘cut our suit according to our cloth’ pretty well. Although our fundraising efforts fell a little short of the target, the expedition is on track and we will be able to complete it more or less according to plan.

The new museum in Brasilia.We have avoided having to take several of the flights which were originally planned, by extensive use of the telephone and by getting friends to take stuff for us – which of course is good news because it reduces the theoretical carbon footprint of the expedition, though our absence from the flights can hardly be claimed as a major breakthrough in the fight against climate change! We have economised by reducing the equipment, which is a shame because we won’t have quite as much to leave behind when we finish the expedition.

One of the flights we didn’t take  was to Manaus, so we weren’t able to examine the boat before it left. However, we are pretty confident in Alegra, who made the boat, and the freighting company seems to be ‘serious’, so we are optimistic that it will arrive in good order.

From here we go by bus to Canarana via Barra do Garcas, where the bridge is broken; we have to walk across with our stuff and board another bus the other side.

© Patrick Cunningham


⇒Next: Canarana!

Please consider making a donation to IPCST to support our work with the indigenous people of the Xingu. Click here.

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